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educator defined my professional path. when i recalled this dismissal in those two sentences, i am reminded of the thing that (inaudible) in the intervening years. however these 12 words are not only enough to express the challenges that my team and i have faced, but they stand for our triumphs as well. despite a skeptical and hostile environment, we survived. starting in the 80s with just 25 students started as the first chinese public school opened in san francisco in 1985. as i remember, i remember the quote, which would you teach chinese to them? i try to recall that and to what my colleague said has grown from a small pocket of multi-ethnic students to a student body comprised of many diverse socioeconomic backgrounds. i try to recall how hard we fought, administrator and parents and students and teachers alike. and what we each sacrificed to be be where -- to be where we are today. today i am humbled by my students who excel in two languages and our students are asked to demonstrate their chinese skills. today our graduates go to beijing, china to build bridges using their skills. to
, commissioner wynn. >> i wanted to point out that the board, the rules committee and the board of education it remains in the process of re-examining all of our policies. on which the rules of board is one section. that's why the format looks change. and not throughout here, and we are still in the process of doing that, and just to reiterate there are sections that we assigned to various committees not the rules committee. and the grounds commission and the curriculum section to the curriculum committee, etc.. and we hope to complete that this year. >> thank you, any other comments from the board? roll call. >> ly. >> yes. >> wong. >> yes. >> fewer. >> yes. >> haney. >> yes. >> mendoza. >> yes. dr. murase. >> aye. >> norton. >> aye. >> wynns. >> seven ayes. >> now we proceed to the annual election of officers for the board of education. as a reminder to the board and public, this election is by voice vote. and we do not need a second, and it's permisable for a member to vote for themselves. good to know. board members you will vote by name. if only one nomination, or more than you vote by
comfortable and i will tell you across race, across class -- maybe that's the way they do it. as an educator, can i? and as a responsibility we have to get power and empowering adults what they can do and the responsibilities are and to name discrete actions and this is bullying and this isn't and it's a much bigger frame about children and adults being safe and being fully present and we're are taking that on as a system and until that time we have done that i don't think we're going to see the real outcomes that we need that are focused ready to engage in communities the way that we need to. i can't give you this is bullying. this isn't. we're making progress in able to talk about it. >> richard. >> i agree everything tony said and as a teacher and administrator and i have children in the san francisco public schools to and this is about the power relationship that one individual has over another individual and the district attorney spoke about sometimes adults are part of the issue where an adult that holds the ability to give you a grade for example and you're a senior and you need
, the culture. they want education, they want a better transit system. they always have ideas to improve the municipal transit system. but when the talk about the bay area, including silicon valley, it is the same thing. transportation symptom -- systems, central subway, high- speed rail. clearly, bart to san jose has been incredibly important to everyone, so that people could travel. i think there is a lot more maturity. there are many successful company that have already turned a corner on making a profit. start-ups have long-term views. they are not looking for instant gratification, as i believe the attitude was in the late 1990's, 2000's. people are talking a lot about issues on stability and asking government, like ours, to be with them in the long term, and to create relationships. certainly, for capital investors, it really is that relationship building. they want that face-to-face time with investors around our city. so we are creating conditions for that to happen. they are not short-term leases, these are long-term leases. twitter signed in for a good 10 years. others have sig
and we do both education and advocacy and on the education end we develop be curriculum and the curriculum is used widely across the country. it's in every state in the country and in canada and 70 countries around the world and programs we're familiar with is second step and i am hearing some nods and we have a -- idea of kind of what kind of things that we do, and i also do advocacy work so i come and speak at meetings like this. i was at the attorney general's meeting in washington state and i would like to congratulate you and especially those in law enforcement in california for the high level of discourse that you have incredibly impressed today by what i have heard and my hats off to you for all the good work you're doing. so i do advocacy and part of that is kind of reaching out to people and bringing the message of social emotional learning not just to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message outside of the school into the media, into the communities, into f
organization as a result of an agreement we have with the department of justice and department of education, so that we don't have any antitrust issues. that is an independent group. we at the american bar association are asking law schools to prepare for -- prepare 10 simple questions about what it costs to go to law school, how many of their students are employed upon graduation in real jobs, not artificial jobs, and we think it is going to be helpful. we also have a website that has a lot of information for anyone considering to go to law school, but probably the most important statistic that these potential students don't know is that the median income of lawyers in the united states is $62,000. they need to understand that before they incur $100,000 in debt. is there always room for another good lawyer? we need good lawyers. there always is. you have to ask yourself how much that you can afford -- how much debt you can afford. they have been watching too much "boston legal." you see $100,000 starting salaries. that may be for the top 10 students at the top 10 law schools. there were 30,000
, really care about. education has always been very center to the things i have been involved with. i am a former teacher also. i work in the early childhood education field for 18 years running an organization. those are parts of my dna. other things that people are not aware of, i do care about health environment in san francisco. i want to make sure that we have enough health facilities to serve all san francisco, not just one part of the city. i want to make sure that our small businesses are supported. why? i come from a family where we had a small grocery store. i understand what it means to run a small business. maybe people think about 500 people is a small business. i'm talking about businesses that drive neighborhoods, support neighborhoods, give jobs to people in those neighborhoods. i want to work with others on the board of supervisors to improve the conditions support them , and make them thrive. those are some of the things, education, the economy. now that we are through the downturn, and dealt with the cuts, we want to make sure that is we improve the economy tha
on the san francisco public utilities commission and for the education plans for the choice aggregation and cleanpower sf program. >> okay. very good. colleagues it's a really as president torres as said it's a momentous occasion, historic occasion we had. we improved our relationship with shell and the allocation for the cleanpower sf and we're looking how the power can be maximized in the next year as we in fact the process of enrollment. i've actually believe that the timing of this could not be anymore -- anymore important to do today because of our global climate change that is happening, and i believe that we're seeing -- actually on the way here today i was listening to the radio. there was a report on democracy now that a portion of our artic ice about the size of the united states of america had melted this year which is significant to really alter what the temperature of the ocean is and we're seeing what really the impact of -- every year we're seeing dramatic examples of climate change and hurricane sandy being one of them. we're also seeing around the world real demogr
long enough to explain the differences as well and to educate on those nuances of renewable energy credit versus bundleeled kilowatt hours and it's complex and i don't know how long they will colerate -- tolerate us on the porch talking but that is a key part and the education component in order to survey them and what they think is an important part of it, so we will be conducting our third city wide customer survey in early january to test this new premium price that we have established and as well as this and the pg&e green tariff option is available to them. we will use the results of the surveys then to redine the roll out of the program. it will help us make sure we anticipate the right number of -- right percentage of opt out across the city, and we will take that heat map i showed you with the green and that survey will modify the specifics of that heat map again because we will have better information once again about customer acceptance of the program and then that wraps up the first quarter and we will have enough information then to come to the public utilities commis
, 2013. discussion of other educational, issues none. and item n, none. item o, we will vote on the calendar for one item that was severed. roll call. >> ly. >> yes. >> wong. >> yes. >> fewer. yes. >> haney. >> yes. >> maufas. >> yes. >> murase. >> yes. >> wynns. >> aye. >> item p, consent calendar resolutions, this our audit, 2-c, and our auditor is in the audience. >> i first want to congratulate president norton and vice president fewer, on your new titles. we have with us tonight leonard dana, to give you a short presentation on our 2011-12 audit. the company has done our audits for six or seven years now. and mr. dana has been a partner on this for three years now i think. >> i am on my second go around. >> exactly. >> usually when we present the audit reports, we usually have a lot to talk about. because of the findings. but i went back and looked at prior reports. and i didn't find one that didn't have one comment in them. and some comments if you go back in time, they are more than ticky-tack items, they were fairly serious items. and it shows from my perspective wher
bringing the film and educating, training professional development largely thriewr our partnership with them and provides that to school districts and classrooms across the country for free, so educators can sign up, and if they agree to do the training and to take it seriously and embed it with the kids and the adults in the community we provide them with oftentimes busing, but often free tickets so they can see the film outside of school and make it an event and that is our project "1 million kids". we're doing it in a big way here in the bay area thanks to the leadership in this community. yep and oakland and all over. it's just awesome and in cleveland and right now we have 13,000 students across the basin in salt lake city are seeing it, and does have impact and the impact is largely i would say it creates a sense of agreement. the biggest thing that bully does or the big service the film has is gives everyone a unified collective science of agreement to which they roll up the sleeves and get busy creating change and has been really exciting. i building we already i belie
the district achieve its goal of equal access to quality education for all of its students. effectiveness of core substit e substitutes could be improved if their jobs were assigned no later than the night before. that was always practiced before previous years. currently jobs are assigned on the morning of the assignment. despite all reasonable efforts to reach the sights on time. it may be that we arrive late, this creates stress for the school staff and disrupts the student's learning routine. thank you. >> good evening commissioners. congratulations president norton and vice president fewer. and good evening superintendent. my name is darlene ania, and i am here today in my capacity as vice president of substitutes with uesf. i wish to direct attention to a problem that has impacted our students and schools for the entire fall semester. though initial steps have been taken to remedy this situation, i believe that this is an important issue which should be kind of spotlighted right now. so we don't have this same problem next year. the problem is an i.t. problem. the system was not in
that our education and how it prepared us as women to be leaders and the fact that your mom was very much an activist involved in the peace movement and they need to know about her. and i said i'm working on this book. i said can i help you? get it published? this is how the journey began. >> host: bernice king your mother come to how active bushy and when did she begin her activism? was born in marion alabama? >> guest: ironically if you study history three of the leading persons in the movement ralph abernathy and my father i'll had wives from carrie county alabama. how ironic is that and mom did not know of one data abernathy. when the movement started they didn't know about them marrying different men in all of that kind of stuff and have brought it all together. and so growing up there in rural alabama with the father who was an entrepreneur or entrepreneur or leon and unheard of as an african-american had his own truck. he hauled lumber. he did open a sawmill and it was burned down by a white gentleman he hired. he would not let that stop them. implements a separate father's determi
is there jeopardy for us? >> so the notification and education program survey and early notification portions are the sort of the new pieces that aren't required by state law. we are using those outreach efforts, those outreach components to inform who we talk to in the actual statutory opt out phase. we are not suggesting that anyone who is going to be served by cleanpower sf would not receive an opt out notification. anyone who wishes to participate can participate which sounds like opting in, but we won't enroll them after we have included them in an opt out process. so i think we have worked with the city attorney on this to make sure we are accurately understanding our obligation and that our approach is consistent with it. we think it is. and so we're not always this careful with our language as we should be, but the actual steps will be anyone who says "let me in" will receive and be included in the opt out portion of the program. >> thank you. >> you're welcome. >> can i add also the people who are seen in the green area that are saying "i don't want to be in the program". they
floor. that print studio is nationally known for its artwork and its educational programs. for the youth guidance center, i just spoke about the presentation that we did for the ada transition plan. we're requesting $400,000. that is to do all the design and architectural construction drawings and obtain building permits for a $3 million project to be funded in 2014-2015. we are also requesting some funds for miscellaneous general services projects. in our master planning efforts that go on to support all of these projects, that is at the level of $400,000. and let's see, we do have some other funding requests in 2014-15. under the plan, we must plan for a two-year cycle of budget requests. and also a ten-year capital plan request. so we're looking at sun setting our funding in 2015. and it will take us through 2015, almost all the way through that year to complete the construction of all of our projects. these funding requests are separate from curb ramp and sidewalk ada transition plan funding projects. all right? so these are the architectural buildings. and that is the end of my re
in education and we're not investing in the future of the children and the in the country and the global future of our world and i agree absolutely with everything you said. we're short changing our kids and not giving teachers the resources. there is mold in the teacher's work room. if i worked in the building that many children go to school in i wouldn't go to work either and in answer to your question there is a priority here about education that's not quite right. >> and while we're earmarking money i would totally support that and i feel that we should train teachers in digital media. you can't teach cooking out a kitchen, so we need to bring digital media into the classroom so people can practice in the environments they're in all the time outside of school. >> and i would say that having listened to the word "media literacy" as far as back when i was carrying 3-inch quarter cassettes years ago and it was a great job. it really was. to teach media and digital literacy out of context is a fool's error and we have the boring curriculums in the world and teaching it out of the context.
of educating our public and all the other kids and families in our city. this is a way of our quality of life, we cannot accept human trafficking. part of the way to do that is to have this be part of the kids education, and push strongly. the collaborative this year, allow the youth of san francisco to enter in a poster contest to provide artistic ability to the messaging of this really important movement. the 2013 poster contest winners i get to announce. i will begin with third-place winners. the third-place winner, first one eighth-grade student, from james brannan middle school. shelley lu (sounds like) apl(applause) also an eighth-grade student from james dunham as well, stella lee. thank you. apl(applause) (applause) to be an eighth-grader. the collaborative has chosen for the second place at 12 greater, from abraham lincoln high school. stephanie chung (applause) and then we have a number of first place winners. i'm sure this is all about collaboration, talking about it, what it means absorbing the purpose and working together. the first place poster altogether for all of us
of the mlk research and education institute at stanford. he joins us tonight from colorado. always good to have you back on this program. >> great to be with you. tavis: at the king day to you. what do you make of the fact that, on this day, we do not just celebrate the legacy and life of dr. king, but the first african-american president inaugurated for the second time? >> there is so much to celebrate on this day and so much to remember about the part of king's dream that has not been fulfilled. particularly the issue of poverty. there are so many things that make us thankful that the civil- rights reforms were achieved. i think it is important, particularly on this day, to remember that, if king were around, he would be pushing us to deal with that have -- that pestering issue of poverty. tavis: why is it that you think that, with all the evidence supporting the notion that pozner -- the poverty is threatening our democracy, it is a matter of national security, one out of two americans are either in or near poverty, the younger you are, the more likely you are to be in poverty, these
are not scholars. they are not someone who comes from an educational background or was taught that in their household. they do not know how to differentiate how to make the right choices. they just know what they have been taught. i am speaking from personal experience. i went to high school and i graduated with a 1.7 gpa. we ran the school, literally. i went to kennedy high school in richmond. it is surrounded by three or four different components. constant shootings -- three or four different hoods. we had to have our varsity football games during school hours. we cannot have it at 7:00 because of the potential danger. there was constant substitute teachers, a lot of bucks. -- lack of books. this is what they are teaching us. not saying that it is a total reason for why it and others turn out the way that we turned out, but it plays a part. just like i have to be held accountable for the choices i make, and so does a society. >> i keep hearing the term gang. in the black community in the bay area, it is a community, it is not a gang. you can move up in their ranks as if you
, that they will survive? i think we can all agree when we began our careers in education, we did it because children deserved better. to thrive and placed in situations to be successful. our jobs. mine, yours, are to remove those obstacles in front of them. and to do our best to give them that path to success. moving this will place a major obstacle in their way. these are students that have dealt with years of ada construction. and last year there was a fire and they were without a cafeteria and not to mention lost every book in the library. they have had to endure so much. and those who could help, and you are about to throw a huge obstacle in our way. i ask is this the best you can do? have you consulted with all parties? are you proud of the work you have done, and the decisions you are about to make? in my opinion unless you have received the answers that you are satisfied with, then you hand the work back to them and say, try again. [applause] >> good evening, i am melissa, the president of the board of creative arts charter school. i appreciate the opportunity to give comment. but really i wo
notification and education plan there, the framework is clear and i think it's a good starting point to move forward for the city and i believe that while we have had comments about talking about caution i think they're well meaning how to have a successful program but i think the success of the program is that we roll out quickly with the notification and the education plan. that's going to be most meaningful. i also want to make sure that we're really clear that the effort is really working in the deep green areas first and foremost where we know a particular target audience is for the message and we know how to craft that message for them as well. i think that is going to be significant. we're not reaching out to every population in san francisco from the get go but the deep green area is where we need to focus the efforts on. this plan incorporates that and i believe it's the right way to go. i would like to move forward approving something today that can later be implemented early next year and hopefully we can move that in that direction. commissioner olague. >> yeah. i just wan
that a right to a education is i social justice issue and if you deny that you're denying their civil rights. that's how we feel about being proactive. now there is a line of demarcation happens and we want to be proactive i know jill is looking at me. when the event happens and there is harm that occurs we believe in restorative practices and repairing the harm. we don't believe in kicks kids out of school. that's not a solution. we are an educational institution. we go through this process and the perpetrator understands the damage and make it right to the victim. it's not okay shake hands. it's a whole process. you talk about it and process what is happening and people follow up on that, so we very much believe in this restorative process in san francisco and how do we know? because of the indicators that should be going up are going up and the others are going down. our truancies are down. suspensions are down and students in class is going up. thank you for being here. [applause] >> okay. that's okay. you jumped ahead to several of my questions so you don't get to talk anymor
to succeed in today's market place. despate progress in education, too many of our schools are still lagging behind, some way behind and especially heart breaking to this father, one in five hoosier children lives in poverty. that is simply unacceptable. [applause] with so many families and business struggling just to get by we have no choice but to remain bold. we have to do better and we will do better and doing better starts with the right priorities. by adopting a road map that says yes to our future and believes in the ununlimited potential of our people and it start by making job creation job one in this assembly and all over this state. [applause] that's why on day one of our administration i signed a moratorium on any regulations to ensure that indiana is not burdening hoosiers employ remembers unnecessary red tape and that's why we proposed a job budget last week. our budget is honestly balanced holds the line on spending, funds our priorities, builds our reserves and it lets hard working hoosiers keep more of what they earned. now let's be clear: government doesn't create jo
. that there is one more thing. so the educational system in college. i think there should be services for financial aid for individuals with disabilities. as you are abruptly thrown into the world with lots of action going on and it's a very hard transition. particularly if you are furthering your education, for folks with disabilities, particularly with financial aid. this is why most individuals don't go to college. that is all, thank you. >> thank you. are there any council members who have a comment or question? go ahead idell. >> thank you. thank you everyone for coming out here today. i have to apologize, i have been sick, so i didn't even know that the meeting would have happened. i would have had a lot more people here. sorry about that, but the next time we do this, which i know this won't be last one, it will be go. what i wanted to say is having access -- she was talking about the internet -- having cable or something at a reasonable price. we have people with disabilities and seniors just siting this their house just looking at wall because they cannot afford cable or a telephone
, we are well trained. we do not come out there as police officers. we are into education and training. we are not looking to enforce. we tried to instill the idea that the security plan is paramount, providing the framework by which an establishment protect itself from inappropriate behavior and criminal acts for a working relationship with the community and the police. there is that umbrella of security and personnel. we looked at the management to hire the appropriate personnel. hiring, training, and supervision. everything that you need. all of our problems come from the over service of alcohol. we ask for owners to train for over service. we also look for physical security measures, like scanning. additional parking and security of the exterior is important. we think that an ongoing plan management -- constantly as cds nightclub owners assessing management. it is readjusted when necessary. the bottom line is they have a great security plan and they will limit their liability. it is all about making money and defending yourself against liability. that is what we try to preach to cl
of service and to educate small businesses on action steps to achieve accessibility compliance. dbi is meeting with the office of small business to determine the most appropriate use of these very limited funds. and which are the result of passage of senate bill, 1186 by the state legislature last september so that is something that is important to us based on the conversations in the past. >> acting director, director and i have recently met with the office of small business to executive director to discuss ongoing compliance issues around the number of vacant commercial storefronts. >> it does not appear that it could effectively address, vacant storefronts especially in buildings otherwise occupied. we remain available for follow up discussions on these issues. these conversations are helpful and we obviously can't accomplish the goals all of the time. but at least the communication we can come up with creative ways of assisting these issues to the department. >> dbi along with other departments is participating in the data survey, at the request of small business and the mayor's
of our board of education, -- mendoza. with that, mr. mayor, would like to join us? (applause) >> i would like to give our mayor the opportunity to say a few words on today's occasion. >> thank you everybody. happy new year! i wanted to be here the congratulate the supervisors who have been reelected, as well as the new elected supervisors and to welcome those families and friends who have come along way i'm sure, whether working with the newly elected, or alongside all of us for many years. i want to acknowledge the public officials that have been identified in the commissioners and department heads, for being here today. a sincere congratulations to board president chiu for you nomination in your reelection as board president. i look forward to working with you and with the whole board to continue the success of our city and to make sure that the dialogue but we have just heard, whether the celebration that supervisor yee had last night or london had today - sorry, supervisor breed, we are all still calling ourselves each by our first names - we continue making sure that the
years now, the first day of my second term, has been one of continuous education. i want to thank you for that. i want to introduce my family. i'm getting emotional. first off my beautiful wife karen cepeda [sounds like]. (applause) together we have two kids, renee and emiliana who are in school today. we have been through what close couples go through in terms of raising kids and facing adversity and figuring out how to make a household work. it has been wonderful 15 years. my mom is year, linda parks and stepfather. (applause) i think that what i really got % most of all from my mom % is really how to think and be thoughtful about the people. and i take that with me wherever i go. i draw inspiration from being around people. i want to say thank you for my life and what you have given me. my stepfather joe has given me a great opportunity, never expected that and i want to thank you for that. i wanted to do is my dad, hector avalos. it's time for resemblance i tihnk, for the gray look. my dad is important to me as well and taught me about the value of work. working with oth
deeper anymore. i don't have a formal education in i.t., however, i have deployed some systems when i was working for the industry, and i brought in young, energetic staff to help. we implemented this. it took three months. people knew when they were going to get paid. i think we have a happy contractor community. >> these system improvements have really it increased service to our clients and reduced costs and really improved the bidding environment for our contractors. it's remarkable what she has done. >> been a public service -- being a public servant is a good thing. i love my job. i would never exchange it for anything else in the world. [applause] [applause] >> i am from the department of public works. i have the honor of introducing jocelyn quintos. i will just a real quick, jocelyn works very hard. through her work, a lot of contracts and a lot of work that she does -- she has brought new systems that have saved a lot of tand time and allowed us to give contracts and make payments very fast. please meet jocelyn. [applause] >> first of all, i just want to thank spur and mfac f
to apologize for. first thought wrong properly filtered was some kind of rehabilitation or education or part of the c.o. or the p.d. or the d.a., helps first thought wrong become next right thing. you can do it. i can teach the incarcerated population what to want because they always get what they wanted. they wanted more, they got more. they got it, they got it. they want someday, they left with none. they wanted her or him, they got that. i can tell them what to want now. pass first thought wrong, what to want. they do the right work, i can show them how to keep it this time. my boy's safe all day. it's not because of me. it's because of efforts like this. [applause] >> as our panelists take the stage and get seated, let me introduce our discussion. earlier this year, california state senator mark leno introduced legislation that would revise the penalty for simple drug possession under the state law, making drug possession laws that punish as a felony would now be punished as a misdemeanor. the new legislation, sb-1506, does not apply to anybody involved in selling or manufacturing drugs.
code, immigration to education, he promised reform. >> we will support democracy from the americas to the middle east because our interests compel us on behalf of those who long for freedom. >> every word was meant to reinforce his aggressive agenda. >> our agenda is not complete until are gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law, for if we are created equal, the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. >> although racial equality was front and center, i think a lot of the second term will be devoted to other things. >> the president takes one last look, noting he will not see this again. will not ever be the focus of the 9000 person parade. he could barely stop himself from dancing, one last night to celebrate his historic presidency before he begins what is expected to be a huge fight with congress. >> president obama's speech dealt mostly with domestic issues. there was not much on foreign policy. let's take a listen to what he did have to say. >> we will uphold our values through strength of arm and rule of law. we will show the courage to
. the president has made a commitment to education and he is running with a 52% approval rate, and this is a good start for a second term. >> what about the critics of the president to say that the deficit has grown and he has not put his weight behind climate change. in his first address, he mentioned climate change three times. and there are still problems in the country and the criticism -- is that he has given a fabulous speech but has not followed through. >> i think some of the criticism is fair but you have to also talk about his initial priorities or challenges. he is really committed to doing something about this in the second term. the deficit is one of the most difficult issues and the president -- he does not sign the appropriation bills until they are passed by congress. and this is not something that the president can do alone. it is the congress decides how big the deficit will be but the president has to work with congress. we need more revenue and we need to drive down spending. i think the president understands that and he is working on this but he cannot do this alone. >> looki
education is now in the florida constitution. i do believe that in america, particularly, everyone is entitled to a quality education. and most certainly in this country, people should not go to bed hungry. that is just unacceptable. the way that the misery index in this country is one that is way out of the line because of the recent economic situation. i do not think that we as a country even understand how the unemployment has affected so many families, and we have a whole new strata called the new league for, people who were driving forces yesterday and in bread lines today -- who were driving portias -- driving porsches yesterday and in redlines today. we need to make sure americans had the opportunity to have reasonable health care. not excessive. the fact is we've got to make sure that what happened in past -- and we know that. a lot of costs have spiraled out of control. we have to have a baseline. this country has promised that in a sense of being a land of opportunity for all its people. the resources that we have in this country are such that we have to make sure that t
civics education, and fight cuts to legal aid funding. it is his mission to make equal justice under law a vibrant living reality for everyone, not just four words carved on the facade of the supreme court building in washington. mr. zack is a passionate and tireless advocate for liberty and justice for all. as he wrote in a letter in today's "daily journal," "that is what our profession does. we get in the way of wrong. we get in the way of attempts to separate and divide our society. we get in the way of those who would let our constitutional democracy whether away from ignorance. we get in the way of those who would further widen the justice happen in our country." please welcome a great lawyer, my friend, and our speaker, steve zack, president of the american bar association. [applause] >> that is a wonderful introduction, bob. thank you for those kind words and for all the good work you do at the aba and have done for many years. thank you for this invitation. it is the world's largest public affairs forum. i love your model. "find truth and set it free." what could be better than t
at education, you look at the programs, traveling around the world, that there is one constant. there are people and technology that say this is a place they want to be. entrepreneurs say this is where they want to be. when companies like facebook are started at an institution like harvard and a pier, you start to recognize why this is so special and fiber and why innovation is a bleeding heart economy. so let me try to give some brief introductions about our panel today. i have to confess, i only just met one of our panelists, lee said dyson, the ceo of coverity. she got a ph.d. in physics from mit but felt the urge to come out here to california and she did her research at stanford and lawrence berkeley. that is an indication we are getting smart people like her out to california to start companies like hers. 15 employees in 2008. it is interesting, we talk about cloud computing and these technology companies, but she takes electronic waste that is rich in carbon and recycles that into oil for plastics and a variety of other things. i wish i had more time to talk to you and g
spent 16 years in women education i applaud women going forward. i don't look like a person of color but if you look at my freckles i consider myself a person of color too. i have worked in district 3, closely with many supervisors. welcome to supervisor yee and breed, welcome aboard. this is a great group. in this me very proud to be a san franciscan, and to call him my supervisor. thank you very much. >> president: next speaker. >> good afternoon and happy new year to you all. it is a pleasure to be here. my name is mattie scott, the founder of healing for our families and our nation, working hard in san francisco over the last 16 years to stop senseless violence. i lost my youngest son to gun violence in 1996, july 17th. we have been ever since trying to educate the leaders, our children, law enforcement, the board of supervisors and everyone present so that we do have one of the situation. i am happy that my district supervisor, london breed, who grew up where my son was killed 16 years ago, is my supervisor for district 5. welcome london. i appreciate the work that yo
to educate about these -- many of our partners year today to educate about these issues. also in terms of board guidance. i want to thank all of you for coming. many of you may have assistance. i know many merchants could not be here. please do it share this information with other merchants in the area. we have virginia from the office of small business. we have roger from the bar association. no carla johnson from the office of disability. -- we have carla johnson from the office of disability. i want to especially it acknowledge my colleague to help us get the resources and brought legal expertise to the table. i do not want to take too much of your time. thank you for coming. >> thank you, supervisor chu. i want to express my admiration for a supervisor chu's commitment to you. so, from our office, what we heard, many small businesses were receiving lawsuits regarding it the ada. tonight we will hear about the legal requirements, what has been in place. any small businesses that nderst informed as far as their obligations for the ada, there are the mechanisms to provide that informa
to make a motion to divide the question. one, about the 1.1 million dollars about the public education enrichment fund and separately 843 million dollars from the general fund's stays federal reserve. initially i wanted us to divide the file entirely to send two files to the mayor who indicated that he would sign it so that we could get the 1.1 million to the school district immediately. >> motion to divide is not debatable. will consider those two items. supervisor mar. >> i want to support the whole -- supplemental brought by supervisor kim. i want to speak to the accountability of the school district. another the former school board president, norman yee and others have successfully brought the school district to a stronger financial state. they have achieved a perfect score in the recent audit; never before has any governmental agency seen that. it's a good testament to the work that the former president of the school board jay kim and our colleague norman yee have done. also the sfusd action plan to presented the plan at the previous financial meeting showed that it was mone
educate those landlords that basically are mom and pop type landlords? the live on one flat and there is another flat. one of the issues with smaller homeowners, property owners, they seem to be not as sophisticated and aware of all these new things that go on. i will like to see some education program do some outreach. and make sure that their tenants will have the benefits. >> supervisor mar. >> supervisor mar: that's a great suggestion. the department of health is working with tenant organizations. making sure that not only representative groups but smaller property owners have multilingual materials. the department of public health has been working at the small business level and other places and we need an outreach policy. that's a great suggestion. >> i want to thank supervisor yee of raising the issue of small mom-and-pop landlords who may not always be aware of all the regulations and we need to outreach to them. in addition to the apartment association, -- >> i forgot to mention that supervisor malia cohen is a cosponsor. >> president: can we take this item s
teachers and educators in that agency, in an agency very committed to closing that achievement gap because despite of having the top performer school district we also have the widest achievement gap. only in the last year we have seen a steady decrease in the gap and for me the investment is going to further decrease the gap. i am sorry i not mention the members of the committee, advocates, members of the san francisco parent -- college track, booker t. washington, -a -for your many months of work on this issue. the budget is always a choice, a choice of priorities. this rises to the top in terms of how we spent our general fund dollars i know we don't. all agree with where the source of funds come from. we have a 15 million dollar estate reserve fund, and now we have a 74 million dollar revenue top of that because of the increase in the economy. for me the commitment to the community is that if we are helping companies grow in the city and helping them prosper, that funding will eventually come back down to the community, support the communities that needed the most. >> supervisor breed
in that process. >> 18 reasons was started almost four years ago as an educational arm of their work. and we would have dinners and a few classes and we understood there what momentum that people wanted this type of engagement and education in a way that allowed for a more in-depth conversation. we grew and now we offer -- i think we had nine, we have a series where adults learned home cooking and we did a teacher training workshop where san francisco unified public school teachers came and learned to use cooking for the core standards. we range all over the place. we really want everyone to feel like they can be included in the conversation. a lot of organizations i think which say we're going to teach cooking or we're going to teach gardening, or we're going to get in the policy side of the food from conversation. we say all of that is connected and we want to provide a place that feels really community oriented where you can be interested in multiple of those things or one of those things and have an entree point to meet people. we want to build community and we're using food as a means to that
is a promise to support our families, our neighbors, are own with education. this is a promise lives lost. to be open to all possibilities. there is no agenda other than to make our community a safer and better place. this is a promise. to have a conversation on all the issues. conversations where listening is as important as speaking. conversations were even those with the most opposing views can debate and goodwill. this is a promise. to turn the conversations to action things must change. this is a time. this is a promise. we make to our precious children because each human life is filled with promise and we continue to be filled with unbearable pain; we choose love, belief, hope instead of anger. this is a promise. to make everything in our part not as a place with victims but a place where real change can be made. our hearts are broken. our spirits are not. this is a promise. as a parent i have never had anything hit so close to home as it did the other day. the second item is a hearing at a different vein to discuss and have it public and open dialogue about the cleanliness of our
population here, they want educated workers to come. but for those who do, it's still back to school. these are spanish engineers with six hours a day of intensive german learning. and it's not just the young. >> you need a lot of time. a lot of effort. and then it's really difficult to learn german. >> difficult even when you can speak some. samuel is an i.t. specialist. he lost his job because of the spanish crisis. now he wakes each day at 4:00 to deliver germany its bread. this isn't the life he imagined. >> after three months if you have to job, you start to run out of money. this is the second step for me. >> there will be many more like him. europe and the unemployment is still rising and the educated jobless will travel wherever they can to build a future. matthew price, "bbc world news," germany. >> 40 years ago today the supreme court reached a landmark decision in the case of row versus wade. it gave women thal constitutional right to abortion but did not achieve consensus. so it's not hard to get an abortion since the court ruling. this report from mississippi. >> anna, h
of regulations. higher education is turning to the web to gain revenue. as colleges look for new ways to make money -- some -- such as san jose state university -- have added online courses -- to attract students. at for-profit institutions such as university of phoenix -- students obtain their degree on the internet. now -- many colleges and universities with physical campuses are trying out the web model. the education sector has struggled to add revenue throughout the recession. cordelia maloney -- of the unversity of illinois at chicago, says the online model could take off if universities find a way to do it right. "i think what people are really struggling to do right now is figuring out how to make it work. how to offer a very high quality education at a resonable price. and do it in a way that is engaging for students so that you don't have situations where students get into these things spend money on it -- and then discover they can't complete it." maloney says nearly a third of all students 25 and older are taking classes online. americans are spending more money to spruce up their
have the very smart people just talking amongst themselves to educate us. so one of the questions that we're wanting to talk about today was the idea of free will in terms of the criminal justice system. and i would like to ask each of you, is there a definition of free will in the context of your individual work? we'll start with you, doctor. >> i would punt that one right over to david who is the expert in free will, and then we actually spent all last night debating this. david can start. >> ok. >> do you consciously choose to do that? [laughter] >> i think that free will is a mainly unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will
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